Winter garden I added to this fall. I removed some flowers and grasses to enlarge the potager closer to the house. Today we had our first snow of the year. It looks like we are having an early winter this year. I have been working on my winter/ fall garden all year and added some other crops to fall seedlings I placed out in spring.
Winter garden I added to this fall. I removed some flowers and grasses to enlarge our urban potager closer to the house. Today we had our first snow

In the city, we have microclimates, and we can grow our food a bit longer than those that live out in the country. Our microclimates are created by our buildings since they shelter our growing areas keeping them a bit warmer than they would be out in a more rural area. They also provide opportunities to grow our food a bit earlier in the spring since our soils may warm up a bit sooner than out in an open area.

Kale + Swiss Chard that I  started under lights this past spring and placed out in march to april...they were munched on a bit by critters early spring, but they recoverd and are now providing wonderful fall salads. The Swiss Chard does not handle the cold as well as Kale, so I do cover it as   the snow gets deeper and colder...
Kale + Swiss Chard that I started under lights this past spring and placed out in march to april…they were munched on a bit by critters early spring, but they recovered and are now providing wonderful fall salads.  Swiss Chard does not handle the cold as well as Kale, so I do cover it as the snow gets deeper and colder. It may not make it to spring, it all depends on the microclimate area I placed it in the yard. Since I rotate crops each year, it is a mystery. In this area I have found the Golden Heirloom Swiss Chard to live through the snow and start growing next spring. I read some where this french heirloom is quite hardy.

One can not generalize to ALL urban growing areas since each site is different due to how the property is laid out. You have to examine your own space and find out where it thaws more quickly, or when the ground freezes etc…the key is to try a variety of “the cold season vegetables” throughout your urban growing site. As you consider your own growing environment, you will discover what does best in various locations throughout your city lot. I have at least 5 or more areas that thaw and freeze at different times. Fall or Winter Gardens are very similar to summer gardens you just have to “experiment” with a variety of crops and find out what you like to eat and what grows best in your growing zone.

 Fall planted Red Beets and Radicchio covered with first snowfall...
Fall planted Red Beets and Radicchio covered with first snowfall…

I have found I do not need to cover many of my vegetables, but they have their season just like summer crops, for example, some vegetables need protection from snow. It is important to take notes on your own growing area and study it over each  growing season to determine which places are best to grow  you fall/winter vegetable crops.

The snow today is quite heavy and pulled down all grasses in the Urban Potager.  Our dining area is usuallly not visible across the yard, but the snow pulled all these tall grasses and plumes to the ground...
The snow today is quite heavy and pulled down all grasses in the Urban Potager. Our dining area is usually not visible across the yard.

Here, is more detailed information about microclimates

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microclimate

Wet, heavy snow is covering the winter/fall vegetables...
Wet, heavy snow is covering the winter/fall vegetables…

I grow a lot of Kale in my yard! Kale was THE vegetable that motivated me to  start growing MORE food on my city lot since every time I went to the farmers’ market kale was always gone, and even if I got up early it was still gone. So I decided to grow my own about 10 yrs ago, and the rest is history. It is one of the easiest plants to grow and a nutrition dynamo.

Dwarf Blue Scotch Kale is never loaded down from snow like our tall grasses. All you have to do it hit the snow off this kale and they just stand tall and strong and blue green!
Dwarf Blue Scotch Kale is never loaded down from snow like our tall grasses. All you have to do is hit the snow off this kale and they just stand tall and strong and blue-green!

One of my fall/Winter Kale Garden Champs is Blue Scotch Kale. I start it from seed under lights in the spring and transplant the young seedlings outdoors. In our area,  this Kale tolerates a pile of snow cover! It just bounces back when the snow thaws. It is a shorter variety, so I do tend to brush the snow off of it when we have smaller amounts. It looks very pretty out in the winter garden with snow falling on it, and it tastes great. This year, I found a hard to find purple curly leaved Kale that is open-pollinated for next year. I am so excited to find out what it looks like and how it will perform in my urban potager.

Kale Transplanted from backyard to Containers Fall 2012

https://palmraeurbanpotager.com/2012/11/25/kale-is-perfect-for-city-growing/

Watermelon Radish that I started late summer. I used seed from different seed savers and I do believe I have some interesting combinations...
Watermelon Radish that I started late summer. I used seed from different seed savers and I do believe I have some interesting combinations…

I start most of my  Fall /Winter growing greens in early spring under lights. I plant them out when the snow thaws since they can tolerate the cold.

Today I collected Golden Swiss Chard, Dwarf, Russian and White Kale for salad in the snow...
Today I collected Golden Swiss Chard, Dwarf Blue Scotch kale, Russian and White Kale, and parsley for salad in the snow…

I also am growing a Scottish Heirloom Swiss Chard next year that has  solid red leaves which are good for  your health. I have the seeds for these, but will not be able to share how well they do until I grow them out next year. I continue my quest for the most nutrient-dense foods for cold winter gardening!

Swiss Chard growing in Palm Rae Urban Potager

https://palmraeurbanpotager.com/2013/08/08/swiss-chard-in-urban-potager-kitchen-gardens-perfect-vegetable/

Merlot Red Lettuce that I started late summer and it is developing a beautiful red color.
Merlot Red Lettuce that I started late summer and it is developing a beautiful red color.

The champ for lettuce this fall  was Merlot Lettuce, which is a lovely red lettuce. It takes a long time for it to start growing in the August Summer garden, but the second batch I started in September is starting to take off with our cool nights. I find lettuce is good as long as you get a ‘thaw” during the day. When the ground freezes here lettuce is not too good that late in the season, for example, December/January. However, I believe if I put a bit of protection over it should do well.

Watermelon Radish that I started in late summer, but I have some interesting colors here from this seed. That is a radish, not a beet!
Watermelon Radish that I started in late summer, but I have some interesting colors here from this seed. That is a radish, not a beet!

I grow Watermelon Radish in the Fall/Winter Garden(French Breakfast + Purple radish in the spring), but this year I did not get too many “true watermelon Radish” many of them did not develop a true Watermelon Radish. The seed savers must have had some of them cross, but I did get a dozen large ones to use. I find this radish is large enough for two salads, and I like to use this in our fall/winter gardens since they are beautiful sliced on a fall salad!

This is my salad today! Golden Swiss Chard, Kale, Red Lettuce, Parsley, Watermelon Radish, toasted nuts, and grated asiago cheese..yum…I look forward each fall/winter for our cold season vegetables..can’t imagine this garden just sitting here when we can get all this food!

It is snowing today! I have all my fall/Winter crops in the ground producing. We also have, beets, carrots, and radicchio ( but just the young leaves since I planted them in late summer), arugula, tatsoi,and parsley. One thing I have learned about growing a fall/winter Urban potager/Kitchen Garden is it takes time to study and learn what best grows in your microclimate and what your family likes to eat…….gardening develops “patience”..a trait hard to find in our busy plugged in world…but when you do start growing a fall/winter urban potager/kitchen garden you no longer see Fall/Winter as a time for your garden to sleep!

Written by Robbie

M.S. Education, , Organic Gardener, soil + nature lover, former modern dancer

14 comments

  1. Beautiful Robbie! I must try that heirloom Swiss Chard. Red leaves you say? I cannot even wait for your report! I love, love, love kale and mine came back too after the rabbit grazing – all but my favorite – Lacinato which is great in Northern Spy Kale Salad (food52.com). Your salad looks delicious and I’m going to have eat now!

    1. Hi Kathy,
      The leaves are all red and it is an heirloom from Scotland that is hard to find. I found it at wildgradenseed.com. Check them out they are seed savers and I try to support small seed growers.
      It is under the name MacGregors Favorite. We both could try it next year! They have the other swiss chards,too and some interesting vegetables of the leafy type just perfect for our gardens that we can squeeze in between our flowers:-) I am so glad I am not alone in the world as a BIG fan of Kale..we should start a fan club just for Kale..it is the new spinach some people say!

  2. Beautiful! I love kale in the snow. It seems that ours gets sweeter after the snow. Wonderful photos and beautiful veggies! Always love when I see others gardening when the typical response is you can’t (fall/winter). Salad looks awesome.

  3. Great minds think alike!!! I posted a winter story today, too (but, thank goodness, we did not get real snow yet! we’ve had enough stormy Halloweens to last us a while!) You’ve inspired me to get my mache and garlic planted today finally. Or tomorrow…no later than tomorrow. 😉 Thanks for sharing!!!

    1. Today we have beautiful weather! It is in the 50’s again, I believe indian summer is upon us and enjoying it very much. I got my garlic in last week, and I planted a larger bed of mache for the spring. Here, the mache bolts rather quickly as it warms up in late spring:-) I don’t mind winter it gives me time to rest, but spring seems so far away:-)

      1. You’re ahead of me–I just got the garlic in yesterday before the hard freeze! Had to break the ice on the ducks’ water bowls this morning so it’s officially (early) winter!!!

      2. I know that is what we had a week ago, but now we have Indian Summer today( november 4th), so good old mother nature teases us one more time!:-) I was early this year with my garlic which is unusual for me!

    1. Hi Lrong, I believe it is one of those early snows that only happens once-lol. We are back to normal weather this week. I was not ready for snow in October!

Comments are closed.